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GEORDI LaFORGE Inks by Jerome-K-Moore GEORDI LaFORGE Inks by Jerome-K-Moore
Comic Book Cover, DC COMICS, STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION.

On this cover illustration, I collaborated with my friend, artist Jason Palmer. He penciled Geordi LaForge's portrait, and that of the alien boy. Jason composed the images simply, and magnificently, showcasing the boy, but still allowing Geordi prominence. I then inked over the pencil image, adding scaly skin to the boy's face, tonal shadows and textures with china marker, and white opaque gouache effects. The spatter was achieved with an old toothbrush.
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:iconjullezart:
JullezArt Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
great piece
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:iconkaizokushojo:
KaizokuShojo Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2011   Traditional Artist
Nice work. :thumbsup: Your inking is very clean.
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:iconcankeredrose:
CankeredRose Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2009
This is the most bad ass Geordi has ever looked.
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:iconsuspicious-character:
I like this quite a bit. I think I might actually have this issue somewhere in the depths of my cave I call a closet. Geordi's the man! Do you actually like Star Trek or is this just a job for you? I'm just wondering because I know a lot of people that produce pieces of art that are just not into the content. I don't mind either way, it's just nice to know that the person who did the work also likes what they see as well.
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2009  Professional Filmographer
I was fortunate enough for it to have been both. I always loved Star Trek as a kid, and being allowed to illustrate the characters professionally was a dream come true. It's my opinion that projects most often benefit from the participation of those creators who best admire and understand them-- not so "fanboy" close so as to lose perspective, and not so detached so as to harbor disdain or boredom for the property.
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:iconsuspicious-character:
So, how do you become a cover artist for a comic book? Any tips for me? I have always wanted to work in the industry. I really am more of a writer, however. Either way, what should be my first steps to making something happen? I was thinking I might just send some of my originals out to some company's and see who bites. Do you have a better suggestion?
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2009  Professional Filmographer
All righty, then...

There really is no set formula, no marked path to tread. Circumstances vary, and they may vary even more now that the industry has changed so much since I broke in long ago. There was no internet when I was a hungry young kid looking for comics work, schlepping my portfolio to conventions and mailing samples to editors. Today, an artist can also prove his/her mettle and ability by posting work on sites like this one (Yes, comics editors do patrol Deviant Art.). It's more a matter of being earnest, diligent, and persistent, along with being talented. Building a solid reputation is vital as well. Once an editor believes you're talented enough, it must then be demonstrated that you can be consistent as far as schedules and deadlines. An assortment of work on a generous scale, rather than just a few samples, goes a long way to show how much you love to draw. A wider range of style and content shows diversity, and a preparedness to handle whatever the assignment may entail (This increases your potential value as a pro.).

Continue posting a variety of good work. Continue to bug editors so they remember who you are. Endeavor to establish your own powerful style presence that is fresh, not so reliant on other artists as influences. Master different types of media, focusing on a fundamental foundation of traditional tools first, THEN expanding to digital. Network with the professional artists you discover online, and in person at comics conventions (You never know when a professional may be reminded of you when they have extra work, and a recommendation is often a crucial way of entry into the business.)

Above all, imbue your artwork with a compelling sense of STORYTELLING. Pretty illustrations are a dime a dozen, but the greatest hallmark of a talented illustrator (whether in comics, or animation, or marketing, etc.) is in the deft ability to illustrate IDEAS. Sure, you can draw from photos, or you've mastered drawing muscular people in superhero tights. But can you draw according to instruction? Can you depict a specific scene effectively so that it convinces a wide audience of a specific concept in ONE SINGLE IMAGE? Can you also tell a story with sequential art, pacing the action interestingly and dynamically, as well as artistically, always getting the point of the STORY across as the chief mandate rather than showing off how pretty your figures are? Draw EVERYTHING, including people in regular street-clothes, in various attitudes and historical drapery, animals of all sorts, buildings and objects in all perspectives in every kind of lighting, vehicles and machinery, landscapes... Learn to properly convey mood, not just action. Master subtlety alongside the overt, as these are the tools of good drama, and through your illustrations, you will be the one acting, orchestrating every character's performance. Draw what is seen and available as reference, and that which is not. Drawing "out of your head" is an underrated skill among so many artists, but it distinguishes the truly inventive draftsmen. You may be called upon to conceptualize, and this means employing your imagination in a more challenging way. The mind's eye is where fantasy finds a portal to perceived reality, and the artist who channels this process masterfully becomes the visionary.

Now, accomplishing all these things well in a 20-plus comic book story is difficult enough. Accomplishing the equivalent on a comic book cover can be even more challenging as you bear the responsibility of instantly capturing the interest of the casual observer passing by the comics shelf. The standout comic book cover artist must also have a solid grasp of the pinnacle of commercial art, much like the old movie poster artists, the package art illustrators, and the book/magazine art mavens, because this is the type of art that has to market the product most efficiently and succinctly. You get one shot. BAMM!! Change a customer from a browser into a buyer in an instant based solely on the image you have created. This snippet of story you have just told has to pique the customer's curiosity so much that the product MUST be investigated, and the secrets revealed. THAT'S the mark of a true professional artist in the commercial ranks-- a STORYTELLER.

I can only offer advice based on my own personal experiences, insights, and observations. Seek out the counsel of other professionals too, since their perspectives may vary from mine, and this is also of value to you. Acquire every scrap of information you can in a dogged pursuit. But finally, do it because you are driven, because you love the art, because you love the medium, and the toil is a welcome measure of your intense commitment. Do NOT pursue this as a career with illusions of attaining wealth or fame, especially in these troubled times. Such things should always be the supplemental result of earnest achievement, and a reward for dedication. If this is the case, you will remain grounded, with a secure and levelheaded ego and your love of the medium intact. Such flighty things are transitory after all, and perilously fickle. Your attitude should be that if some fame comes or if it doesn't-- so what? That is not the motivation. Draw because you love to draw. Draw comics because you love story, and you love creating characters.

Become a professional artist because you have no choice, and there is no other aspiration. It's not what you wish to be, it is what you already are inside, and the world must recognize this fact. Brace yourself for discouragement and cold rejection along the way, but let it harden your resolve. Strive to learn from every negative experience even more than the positive ones. Failure is the partner of Success, and though you may often hear from one more than the other, you WILL hear from both of them at some point. Never forget that. When Failure's voice seems to be the only one you can hear, use that to get angry. Use that to attune your focus anew toward strengthening and growth, so that you can make Success be the next voice you hear, again and again, and it will resound far louder than any memory of puny failure.

Here I have given you what pragmatic advice I can, as well as a bit of philosophy, no charge. Distill from this what you find beneficial, and when you become all that you hope to become, pass on your lessons and advice to the next aspiring artist in unselfish magnanimity.

I hope I have been of some help.

All the best to you. :)
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:iconratwood42:
ratwood42 Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2008
Hey! I have this issue! Nice work!
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:iconflowcoma:
FlowComa Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2008  Professional General Artist
Awesome inkwork again man, especially your use of splatter. Lovely control. What size was the original done at?
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2008  Professional Filmographer
Control? It was just a matter of aiming the toothbrush at the portions of the art that weren't screened over. Nothing special, really.

It was the standard cover size for most comics, approximately 11"x 17".

Thanks!
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:iconflowcoma:
FlowComa Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2008  Professional General Artist
haha well hey, way to mask out bits and spray ink then ;p at the end of the day its all just a series of technical processes if you want to reduce it to that, sure.

I was complimenting your overall effect of the splatter and other linework combined which looks dirty but controlled... its quite nice.
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2008  Professional Filmographer
Gotta luv that well-managed grime effect. HaHa!
Credit must go to Bill Sienkiewicz for paving the path with his trademark gritty painting style. He's one of my many influences.

Thanks again!
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:iconflowcoma:
FlowComa Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2008  Professional General Artist
Same here, Sienkiewicz is the man.
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:iconskeevy:
skeevy Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2008
Looking at this is BLOWING MY MIND.

I thought I'd tell, briefly, my funny story. See...I've been sheltered from comic books all my life, and until recently never took real notice of even the kind of art used in advertising posters, much less proper illustrations. NO formal training, obviously. I kind of thought, for a long time, that my "line art" was some strange, backward stage that I was too immature to pass through and get to "real art" consisting of oils and in color. My work is, as yet, crude but I can see what you're doing and really. Blowing my mind. It's like finding out that, after years of living on what I thought was an uninhabited planet, there were cities and cultures and everything flourishing just a few miles away from me.

Why wasn't I exposed to more of this?

I hate to make any demand on your time, but I'd like to ask...What do you think I should read? Particularly I have nearly no experience with the mysteries of texture, of "crosshatch", of these cool techniques you've made use of. Maybe you could save me some wandering around in the dark (although I'm not kidding myself into thinking I'll pick up some fantastic skill without years of drudgery). Don't doubt I'd buy books to improve, so recommend away if you know any in particular.

<3
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2008  Professional Filmographer
Sorry about blowing your mind. Happens to me all the time, and I know how painful and messy it can be.

But, welcome to a world of enlightenment here among your kindred. When I was first invited to join this site, I gawked in amazement at the wide range of talent here, as well as the unique opportunity to share and learn. Pull up a chair, and take advantage of the bountiful feast.

As for what to absorb in your training, and books to read, I would recommend whatever you can get your hands on that strikes your fancy, and a few things that don't. This will help you become well-rounded. Balance your intake of pop art with fine art. Bear in mind, there will always be pitfalls, and wrong turns. But these things also have their value in marking the path you hope to tread. Yes, there are years of drudgery ahead, and challenges that will seem insurmountable. However, anything worthwhile demands time, and great effort. If it were easy, then everyone would be doing it.

Off the top of my noggin, regarding textures and cross-hatching, I'd look up the works of Arthur Rackham, Winsor McCay, Joseph Clement Coll, Charles Dana Gibson, Winslow Homer, James Montgomery Flagg, Maurice Sendak, and Gustave Doré, as well as several of the classic comic book masters, including Michael Golden, Bernie Wrightson, Gene Colan, Frank Frazetta, and Alex Raymond. There are also some pretty awesome fellow Deviants online here you might want to check out in my Favorites Gallery.

Above all, try to banish fear. Confidence is the fuel that stokes the creative fire. Remember that.
As for the rest-- have FUN!!! :)
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:iconskeevy:
skeevy Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2008
To make a dorky sci-fi refrence...you're my new favorite yoda. <3 Thanks! I copy and pasted those artist/authors and will be hitting my library post haste to see what I can dredge up. Free comes first! Thank you so much for the recommendations and encouragement!
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2008  Professional Filmographer
HaHa! All mine, the pleasure is. :yoda:

But, I'm a lot taller that the old Jedi Master.

Ironically, I decided to post my response to your requests in my latest journal entry, and it struck me to use the Yoda allusion, too. Weird coincidence!
But the hope is that any other young Jedi out there in a similar position of beginner's excitement and curiosity can benefit as well. :)
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:iconadrianperezacosta:
adrianperezacosta Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2008  Professional General Artist
Amazing ink (and whiteout) work
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2008  Professional Filmographer
Muchas gracias, amigo.

But it's opaque watercolor, not White Out. ;)
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:iconstevenartist:
Stevenartist Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2007  Professional Artist
Very cool! I love all of your Star Trek work. Ah, and the old toothbrush/splatter technique! I have gotten many a' white or black thumbnail! Old skool rules!
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:iconwynnter89:
wynnter89 Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2007
fantastic detail !!
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:iconpjbro:
PJBRO Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007
im doing a captain kirk and gorn story for phil jiminez's cartooning portfolio class at the school of visual arts.

I was wondering how you use refrence to capture likeness...which is to say, how do you go about familiarizing yourself with the characteristic that make up shatner? or do you find more or less specific refrence photos of his poses.

thanks man, love your work

-Paul
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007  Professional Filmographer
When dealing with likenesses, reference is always necessary. One cannot "imagine" someone's likeness. That's original creation.
The type of reference varies:
- Life Drawing, or other three-dimensional representation (like a sculpture, or action figure)
- Video or photographic images
- Memory
Drawing from Life with a celebrity is an extremely rare opportunity, next to impossible. lol So the best option is video or photography, especially when rendering illustrations based on subjects and material from the past, i.e., the classic Captain Kirk.

My assignment as cover artist didn't require me to render Shatner's likeness in a story containing sequential drawings, so I could essentially do portraiture. However, in illustrating an entire story, relying too heavily on photo reference can make the art and likenesses appear stilted, and staged. If at all possible, the artist should learn the subject's facial features, expressions, body structure and language in order to draw the subject more naturally. For example, Shatner, in his youth, had the least distinctive facial features among the Trek cast. But pay attention to the most obvious: his high forehead, his hairdo, his stern, authoritative scowl, his squint, and his slight "Kirk smirk"(please see CLASSIC STAR TREK #1 from my gallery). When standing, Shatner usually would be heroically straight, never slouching. OR, he would stand with his weight shifted characteristically to one side, denoting a casual confidence. This contrasted markedly with Nimoy and Kelly, who most often stood deferentially with their hands clasped behing their backs.

Nailing details like these will benefit the visuals of your story. But, obviously, this presents a greater challenge, and calls into play the use of Memory. How well you know your subject when rendering likenesses convincingly in all-new poses hinges upon the most studious observation, to the point of genuine familiarity. I know Trek nearly backwards and forwards. Perfectionism in this area separates the conscientious artist from the illustrator simply accomplishing the assignment, and this perfectionism may go unrewarded by others... even unnoticed. Sometimes this should be expected when doing a job too well.

So, depending on how ambitious you are, I recommend gathering as much photo reference as you can. The Star Trek fotonovels would be of the best use to you, but they're hard to find these days. They were printed episodes of the series, with invaluable photos of the action in book form. "Arena" would be ideal for you, if you can locate a copy.

All the best to you, Paul!
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:iconjrfan:
jrfan Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Student General Artist
Thank you so much for that in depth response! I can get a decent likeness when drawing what I see...but drawing a new pose? That's crazy.
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Professional Filmographer
You're welcome!
Indeed, it is the greatest challenge in drawing likenesses. It's definitely the big leagues. And I often get shipped back down to the minors. LOL!
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:iconmikematei:
mikematei Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2007
starfleet boots are phase resistant. thats why they don't go through the floor. duh!
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:iconnickmockoviak:
NickMockoviak Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Love it Jerome. Looks fantastic.
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Filmographer
Thanks, Nick.
Kudos also to my pal, Palmer, on this one.
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:iconnickmockoviak:
NickMockoviak Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, he's got a lot of talent as well.
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:icontonydennison:
TonyDennison Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007
I never unerstood how they could rationalize him being blind yet they have all this fabulous time traveling, molecular transporting technology.

I mean, we can do eye transplants NOW.

Ah, I'm just kvetching...

Great art, the lighting is really nice.
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Filmographer
That's a rather BIG can labelled "worms." LOL! Don't stop there. Why not ask how Picard can still be bald?
Another can of worms is the one that questions why the minorities in the regular cast were the ones hidden behind makeup or prosthetics. Hmm?
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:icontonydennison:
TonyDennison Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007
You noticed that too, eh?

The issue of race is a delicate one, even in deep space.

As for the disguising of the non-whites: I think that it is, in part, an attempt to "whitewash" or cloud the dynamic; to somehow draw attention away from their blackness...

There was a time when most science fiction sagas would feature a blue or green person in a supporting role to a European. I think the sentiment is generally that blacks "rob" the genre of it's ethereal qualities; reminding us all of the social realities we deal with daily and robbing the film/tv show of its ability to suspend disbelief.

Also, most of the fiction we watch is rooted in European myth/legend where blacks simply did not play a role (unless you count Grendel, or the Kraken). LOL

In some respects it's kinda desheartening to accept that when people create "fantasy" blacks either don't exist or are reduced to the role of "curiosity". LOL

We also see this in art. How many nonwhites did you see in heaven on any rennaisance painting? Few if any... not to mention asians or arabs or anything else.

I see much of the desire to create "green" people or "purple" people to hate and destroy in fictional works as merely a vehicle to exercise some of the innate biases we have which cannot be exercised in our politically correct societies...

I truly hope no one sees this rant as an attack or condemnation, I'm merely exploring the idea...

tony
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Filmographer
As I said, another can of worms. But by no means unworthy of in-depth discussion. Your observations are indeed valid, and thought-provoking.
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:iconjrfan:
jrfan Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Student General Artist
Heh. I always thought they used non-white people as aliens (klingons, in particular) because then they didn't have to worry about radically changing their skin color. :confused:
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Professional Filmographer
LOL!
Perhaps. A convenient excuse, but still inherently racist... whether implicit or explicit, intentional, or coincidental.
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:iconjrfan:
jrfan Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2007  Student General Artist
Very true. Blasted worms! ;)
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:iconmutantpenguin:
MutantPenguin Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007
Geordi was cool! After Data I think he had the best 'character' episodes.
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Filmographer
Which wasn't many.

The one I found most disappointing was the episode where he and Ensign Ro were phased out of our plane of reality by a Romulan device. Great episode, though fraught with logistic problems. The BIGGEST logic boo-boo was Geordi. He was always creating holo-girlfriends, yet here he was trapped in another dimension with a flesh-and-blood Bajoran hottie, touching and hugging... and he didn't make a MOVE!!! LOL!!! STOOPID!!!
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:iconmutantpenguin:
MutantPenguin Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007
Yeah. I always wonder when people are 'phased', and they can walk through solid objects, what prevents them from going through the floor? Does gravity have no effect on them, and they move by sheer will power!? Still a good episode.
I liked the one where Geordi made friends w/ Hue the Borg. And episodes where they say, 'if one of our race was born blind we'd have killed them!'
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Filmographer
EXACTLY!!! They're freakin' standing on the FLOOR! They're breathing AIR! They're still reflecting light! LOL!!! I know we're over-analyzing, and sapping the fun out of it. But shredding the illogic can be perverse fun, too. Kitty Pryde, of the X-Men, should fall through the floor every time she runs through a wall, and she should be gasping for breath whenever she solidifies again. I would address this if ever I get to do a story with her. Don't hold YOUR breath. lol

But yeah, I still like that episode, "The Next Phase." I've always liked LeVar Burton (he's one of the few castmembers I never had the honor of meeting), and Michelle Forbes just rocks in everything she does. Her turn as Admiral Cain on BATTLESTAR GALACTICA was wicked cool.
I liked "I, Borg," too. But I think it was a bit mischievous to name the poor chap "Hugh," pun aside. It reminds me of that gag with Kenneth Mars in Barbra Streisand's WHAT'S UP, DOC?
Geordi should've named the Borg, Splinky. LOL!
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:iconmutantpenguin:
MutantPenguin Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007
Yes, I have similar problems w/ Kitty Pride. But since her phasing is done by her own will power, it would be easier to explain away. Like pinpoint phasing, where she controls which parts of her body are phased. But how does she go strait down into the ground and right back up like she's riding in an elevator? There is an anime called Read Or Die (R.O.D.) where a girl, Ms Deep, jumps from a plane and falls through a building, phasing through the floors, but slows her self down by solidifying parts of her body, and grabbing onto the floors, using momentum and some acrobatics to land safely. It's a truly sweet couple minutes of animation.
Also Baron Karza (from The Micronauts) took over Kitty's body in a crossover comic and frankly made better use of her powers. But I've always liked Kitty.
I have similar problems w/ Kurt's teleportation. What happens to the momentum? He falling though the sky but then teleports into a plane? It his teleportation negated the momentum from the fall, then speed of a plane travelling mach1 still should have crsuhed him!
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Filmographer
MmHmm.

We can over-analyze it with glee, but we do destroy the fantasy of it. It's cool when a writer does a "Crichton," and takes pains to explain the pseudo-science, but even lesser writers not as concerned with such details can furnish a satisfactory entertainment. Over-thinking ruins things, like when John Byrne tried to make Superman into a psycho-kinetic, unconsciously holding buildings and ships together as he hefts them into the air by one corner section. And do we really NEED to know whether Superman's beard grows, or how he uses a mirror and his own heat vision to groom himself? Look too closely and everything unravels like a cheap suit.
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:iconmutantpenguin:
MutantPenguin Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2007
Heh, never thought about Superman's super-stubble. Sounds like it'd make a fun 'day in the life' of comic, featuring the not so heroic tactics of a heroes life.
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:iconjerome-k-moore:
Jerome-K-Moore Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2007  Professional Filmographer
EXACTLY!!! They're freakin' standing on the FLOOR! They're breathing AIR! They're still reflecting light! LOL!!! I know we're over-analyzing, and sapping the fun out of it. But shredding the illogic can be perverse fun, too. Kitty Pryde, of the X-Men, should fall through the floor every time she runs through a wall, and she should be gasping for breath whenever she solidifies again. I would address this if ever I get to do a story with her. Don't hold YOUR breath. lol

But yeah, I still like that episode, "The Next Phase." I've always liked LeVar Burton (he's one of the few castmembers I never had the honor of meeting), and Michelle Forbes just rocks in everything she does. Her turn as Admiral Cain on BATTLESTAR GALACTICA was wicked cool.
I liked "I, Borg," too. But I think it was a bit mischievous to name the poor chap "Hugh," pun aside. It reminds me of that gag with Kenneth Mars in Barbra Streisand's WHAT'S UP, DOC?
Geordi should've named the Borg, Splinky. LOL!
Reply
:icondarthkarnage:
darthkarnage Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2007
awe dude it has been forever since I saw him that is just plum awesome
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:iconclaraious:
claraious Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2007   Writer
A toothbrush? Sweet! XD
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